Outdoor griddle

Any type of high heat grill.

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bsooner75
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Re: Outdoor griddle

Postby bsooner75 » Mon Feb 01, 2016 7:44 pm

Thanks for the tips TXLuke. Some good info there. I cooked three meals on it this weekend. We are loving it.


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Dodis
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Re: Outdoor griddle

Postby Dodis » Tue Feb 16, 2016 3:53 pm

A little late to the party/post... I had posted this up on the BBQ Brethren some time back, but was never able to copy to post it again here, always trying from work with all the firewalls, etc...

This is the griddle I built last year. I need to get out and use it more, but it seems the weather and life keep getting in the way!

If you can't catch a Blackstone on sale, and using either a store bought griddle or making one yourself from steel plate, a used gasser makes a good starting point if you want to build your own.

Mike "Dodis"
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Move over Blackstone, the Red(neck)Stone Griddle is here!
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All of the pics are in this flicker album: https://flic.kr/s/aHskjpVcKY

I had bought the griddle some time back to put on my two-burner camp stove. Then the legs promptly finished rusting off...

So, starting to gather materials and found a used gasser cheap on Craigslist, to get the control valves. Turned out the body was good enough that I just cut it off right at the grill level and the griddle fit right in. Just some new burner tubes and a good cleaning. Gives me an additional side-burner too.

A couple of notches at the back under the lid hinges, and a slight notch on the griddle so it doesn't slide sideways. Notched the lid to match and was able to keep it.

Last was the two twist-latches to hold the griddle down, knowing how SS moves when heated. Also a temporary grease tube for the drain until I can get the time to (try to) weld in a larger drain.

For now, just an empty (Texans) beer can does the trick! That and waiting for a day without rain to get to fire it up.

First cook (FINALLY). Couple of burgers for the two of us, and some more for lunches later in the week. Some grilled onions and mushrooms too!

No plated pics, couldn't hold off any longer!

Now I got another cooker to go with the rest. A Broil King gasser for quick meals, the obligatory Weber kettle, and a UDS. And a two-burner stove once I make some new legs for it...
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Pavlden
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Re: Outdoor griddle

Postby Pavlden » Tue Sep 11, 2018 9:11 am

After a decade plus in the restaurant industry, I've often wondered why nobody has produced a consumer flat top griddle. As soon as I saw this, I knew I had to have it! I haven't even lit my CharBroil Infrared grill (which was twice as expensive) since I got this.
Pros:
The food simply does not dry out. I'm a chef, I know how to work a grill, but when you're grilling at high temps, you can easily over cook a piece of meat, especially when you're chatting up the company or running around getting rolls, toppings, plates, etc. With an open grill, when that happens, the juices go through to the flame and then up in smoke... with this, they stay on the griddle around the meat. Even overcooked, it doesn't dry out.
I get more flexibility. I like cheeseburgers, but I like them thin. I'd much rather have two thin, juicy patties with cheese than one thick, juicy patty with cheese. A thin patty will fall apart on grill grates. We take 3 oz balls of meat, drop them on the hot griddle, sear each side, then smash them to 1/4" thick. The kids get one patty each, the wife and I get two. We can also cook things on this griddle that we could NEVER cook on an open grill. Bacon, marinated cod for fish tacos, toast the rolls in that delicious burger grease, fried onions, cheese steaks, quesadillas, home fries, eggs, pancakes, french toast, garlic bread, sliced meat, onions and peppers, for fajitas, etc, etc, etc...
Construction. This thing is WELL BUILT! The top is very heavy. It's got a great set of casters (two locking) and a handle to move it around. This is not the cheapo flimsy construction you'd get from CharBroil / Brinkman / Old Forge, etc. Think more like Weber. The shelves remove with thumbscrews, which is super easy. I take them off and store them underneath so I can cover it easier. It's also fairly easy to store. Remove the bottom shelf (thumb screws again) and the legs fold into the underside. It can be stored on a shelf for the winter or you can take it with you camping, tailgating, etc. (Although I wouldn't have designs on hiking with it... that top would seriously slow your pace!)
Cleaning. the surface is easy to clean... just squirt some water on it while it's still hot and scrape off the gunk. I use an 8" putty knife since it's flat and sharp. Add a fresh coating of oil to keep it seasoned and protected and you're done. Easily removable grease cup is a cinch to empty.
https://thehomedweller.com/best-outdoor-gas-griddle/

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